ASTINO - Linificio e Canapificio Nazionale

ASTINO REDISCOVERS FLAX AND HEMP CULTIVATION

 

Parco dei Colli, in collaboration with the Italian company Linificio e Canapificio Nazionale, European leader in flax and hemp spinning, brings again

to the Valle della Biodiversità [Valley of Biodiversity] of Bergamo two crops that have been absent in Lombardy since the second post-war period

BETWEEN HISTORY AND FUTURE

Linum Usitatissimum and hemp Cannabis Sativa are two very ancient textile cultures. In fact, some findings can be traced back to 36,000 BC. The yarn that comes from it, noble par excellence, has been used for centuries to dress queens and priests, to make sheets with unequal freshness, to dress chairs and furniture of high quality, for the canvas of the painters and the sails of the sailors. In the future, thanks to innovative applications currently underway, it could also be used to produce technical materials for sports' purposes and for automotive and aerospace industry. Trendy, historical, ecological, modern, beautiful, fresh, European, elegant, colourful and innovative: this is the fabric of linen or textile hemp.

 

AN ANCIENT AND VIRTUOUS CYCLE

A hundred days after sowing, in June, the flax blooms turning the fields into blue-sky stretches. The flowers become capsules and the seeds ripen inside them. This passage marks the time of maturation. The flax is pulled up, the hemp is mowed, and the stems placed on the ground for the rettingn phase. Thanks to traditional industrial processes but with high innovative techniques, the fibers are first transformed into combed tape and then into yarn. The flax or hemp yarns allow the creation of highly refined and valuable fabrics, but also breathable and thermoregulator, that, thanks to their extraordinary versatility, can be used in clothing, furniture, home furnishings and technical applications.

LINEN AND HEMP TIED IN A DOUBLE THREAD TO NATURE

Linen is a fiber of extreme beauty and nobility, while hemp is of high durability and versatility, but both have an even more important value: sustainability. The two fibers, in fact, are 100% obtained from plant and completely recyclable. Their cultivation does not require irrigation, but only rainwater and helps to regenerate the soil, without producing waste or involving any pollution, as pesticides are not used. Finally, flax and hemp are fibers of proximity. From cultivation to fabric, all the players in the European supply chain, especially Italians, are custodians of a heritage made up of know how handed down over the centuries.

 

1,000 kg

linen fiber

for wet spinning

 

400 kg

hemp fiber

for composites

 

400 kg

hemp fiber

for composites